About SGD

The Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD) provides comprehensive integrated biological information for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae along with search and analysis tools to explore these data, enabling the discovery of functional relationships between sequence and gene products in fungi and higher organisms.


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New & Noteworthy

  • New SGD Help Video: Finding Human Homology & Disease Information


    Looking for human disease-related information in SGD? There is so much to find! Active areas of curation at SGD include yeast-human homology, alleles and phenotype variants, functional complementation relationships, and disease associations. There are plenty of ways to find this information on our website, and it takes just 90 seconds to learn how - what are you waiting for? For more SGD Help Videos, visit our YouTube channel, and be sure to subscribe so you don't... Read...
  • Winter is Coming (for Cancer)


    I may be a little late to the game, but over the last few weeks I have started consuming episodes of Game of Thrones voraciously. It is such a fun show to watch! And this isn’t the only HBO show I enjoy. Veep, Silicon Valley, and Last Week Tonight with John Oliver all have my attention as well. You might say that I need HBO, because without it I can’t get my fill of these shows.... Read...
  • A Biological Tour de Force Reveals the Complexity of a Yeast Cell


    As anyone who has tinkered with the inside of a living cell or looked at one of those daunting and overwhelming biochemistry poster knows, life is complicated. Like thousands of gears all interconnected in some vast steampunk machine, a cell has thousands of genes making thousands of proteins that come in a variety of flavors all interacting in overlapping, complicated ways to keep the cell alive. Toss in those important RNAs and a few other... Read...
  • A Nobel Prize for Work in Yeast. Again!


    Dr. Yoshinori Ohsumi has won the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his groundbreaking work on autophagy in yeast. This is the process whereby cells recycle their worn out parts or where a cell, like Mobius, the snake eating its own tail, eats less essential bits of itself to stay alive during times of starvation. Think Scarlett O’Hara using her drapes as a dress in Gone With the Wind (or Carol Burnett’s hilarious... Read...

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